• Soldier Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Public Services Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Aid Worker Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Old Bailey

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Shariya IDP Camp

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Airport Staffing Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Robber With An Aming Gun

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Football Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Bank Risk Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Security Guards

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Fire Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Ambulance Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Security Services Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Police Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Catastrophe Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Barbed Wire Steel Wall Against The Immigrations In Europe

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Employment Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Human Resources, Career Management, Recruitment And Success Conc

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Hospital Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Security Guards

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Disaster Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Security Guards
  • Ambulance Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Airport Staffing Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Catastrophe Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Soldier Support
  • Aid Worker Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Disaster Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Bank Risk Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Hospital Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Robber With An Aming Gun
  • Employment Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Police Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Shariya IDP Camp
  • Old Bailey
  • Barbed Wire Steel Wall Against The Immigrations In Europe
  • Public Services Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Football Support
  • Fire Support

    Psychological Risk Response

  • Human Resources, Career Management, Recruitment And Success Conc
  • Security Services Support

    Psychological Risk Response

Traumatic Incident Reduction (TIR)

Traumatic incident reduction

TIR is a non-clinical, person-centred process

Whilst as we as humans would undoubtedly like to live in a world that was free from bad things, and emotional pain, reality dictates that at some point in our lives we are liable to experience something which has the potential to overwhelm our natural coping mechanisms.

Traumatic Incident Reduction (TIR) is a non-clinical system of social-support enabling individuals to explore and process areas of psychological/emotional concern or distress.

This is a person centred, one to one based approach, during which a Facilitator guides an individual (or ‘viewer’) to explore and inspect their own mental environment, through a highly-structured method of questioning.

Sessions take place in a safe environment, free from interruption, and in comfort.

The aim of the process, is to achieve a resolution and/or a greater sense of wellbeing for the viewer, as their distressing event becomes a source of experiential learning and development, rather than one which causes emotional pain.

We commonly refer to this stage of the process, as an ‘End Point’ – the point at which emotional pain associated with the event falls away, and the memory simply becomes more factual than ‘traumatic’.

In order to achieve this, our TIR facilitators will

  • Be open-minded, neutral and non-judgmental at all times
  • Actively listen to you without imposing their own ideas, interpretations, distractions, suggestions or advice.
  • Empower you to reach your own conclusions.
  • Conduct an open session (not time bound) allowing you to fully engage in the process as long as you wish
  • Not attempt to diagnose you with any illness/ condition or label you in anyway.
  • Be fully focused on you at all times, until the end of your session.

TIR sessions only end when the viewer is ready to end unlike normative counselling ‘therapies’ there is no time limit imposed.

If you feel you could benefit from Traumatic Incident Reduction please contact us here for further details.

We also provide training in Traumatic Incident Reduction and competence frameworks for organisations who wish to develop their own in house peer support program.

Traumatic Incident Reduction in Focus

What is TIR useful for?

What is TIR useful for?

TIR is highly effective in elimination the negative effects of past traumatic reactions.

It is especially useful when:

  • A person feels affected by a specific trauma or set of traumas, whether or not a formal diagnosis of ‘PTSD’ has been applied.
  • A person reacts inappropriately or overreacts in certain situations, and it is thought some past trauma might have something to do with it.
  • A person experiences unaccountable or inappropriate negative emotions, either chronically or in response to certain re-stimulation (triggers)

How long has TIR been in use?

How long has TIR been in use?

TIR has been in use since 1984, although its current format is the result of refinement and adjustment since its first use.

What is the anticipated outcome of TIR?

What is the anticipated outcome of TIR?

In the majority of cases, TIR results in the complete and permanent elimination of most PTSD symptoms. It also provides valuable insights, which an individual arrives at quite spontaneously without any prompting from the facilitator.

What are the contraindications and risks of TIR?

What are the contraindications and risks of TIR?

TIR is contraindicated for use with individuals who:

  • Are psychotic or nearly so. TIR is most definitely an exposure or uncovering technique and hence is not appropriate for such individuals.
  • Are currently abusing drugs or alcohol. Individuals should avoid taking pain killers, sleeping pills, tranquillisers or drugs that may impair their physical or mental abilities for at least 24 hours prior to a session.
  • Are not making a self-determined choice to engage in TIR. For TIR to work, the individual has to want to engage. If an individual is there under duress (e.g. By order of their organisation) or simply to appease someone, TIR will not work.
  • It may be possible for an individual to accept the benefits of TIR, but they must be motivated prior to engagement starting.
  • Have no interest in or attention on past trauma(s). The general rule is to follow the interest of the client.

Since TIR technique is entirely person-centred and non-forceful, individuals will simply discontinue to protect themselves if they find the process too difficult to continue.

Hence, there are no negative effects from properly facilitated TIR.

A cardinal rule of TIR facilitation, is never to force the individual and to always follow their interest.

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Reducing Risk, Increasing Resilience, Improving Performance